VALLEY SPRINGS TOWNSHIP.

(101-47)

 

And Biographies

 

     This township is situated in the southeast corner of the county.  It is bounded on the east by the Minnesota state line, and on the south by the Iowa state line.  It has some excellent farms and farm buildings and, comparatively speaking, no waste land.  The main branch of Beaver creek, which enters Palisade township on section thirty-four and runs in a southwesterly course through Red Rock township, enters Valley Springs on section four, and continuing in the same course leaves the township on section seven.  The other branch has its source in the southeast corner of the township, and runs in a northwesterly course until it forms a junction with the main branch of section thirteen in Split Rock township.  The south line, which is the Iowa boundary line, was surveyed in July, 1852; the east, Minnesota boundary line, in July, 1862; the west, by Cortez Fessenden, in July, 1862; the north, by M.K. Armstrong, in October, 1864, and the subdivisions were made by Carl C. P. Meyer in October 1864.  It contains 15,117.82 acres. 

S.A. Johnson and Alfred Larson, and perhaps some others, took up land in this township as early as 1870.  Frank G. Anderson and Stephen Danielson located there in 1871, and from that time the township was quite rapidly settled.  In June, 1872, Jonathan Dunham and M.L. Wood took up land in section three, and a Miss Nancy Merchant pre-empted a portion of the northwest quarter of the same section, where the village is now located.  Messrs. Dunham and Wood erected a residence, and commenced breaking the land, and thinking the location favorable for a business center, made application for the establishment of a post office.  January 1, 1873, the Valley Springs post office was established, and Jonathan Dunham appointed postmaster, the office being at Mr. Dunham’s residence.  A.C. Stone was the second postmaster, and for a while the office was at his residence, but was afterwards removed to the store of Stone & Howe.  The next postmaster was P.E. Howe.  In 1876, Alfred Larson was appointed postmaster, and in 1880, he was succeeded by Charles Olson.  The first store was established by A.C. Stone and P.E. Howe in the fall of 1873.  The first blacksmith shop was that of C.O. Remming on the north side of the railroad, which was opened in the spring of 1876.  In November, 1880, W.W. Bell opened the first harness shop.  A man by the name of Ljungren erected a store building 20 by 50 feet, two stories high, in 1878, and engaged in the hardware business.  On the 4th day of June, 1878, a station was established on what is now the C., St. P., M&O. railroad, and Valley Springs can boast of having the first railroad station in Minnehaha county.  The first marriage was that of P.E. Howe and Frances H. Acker, and the ceremony was solemnized by the Rev. J.W. Rigby June 28, 1874.  The first birth was that of a daughter to John C. and Martha Shepard.  The first school was taught by Miss Ida Shafer during the summer of 1874.  One of the present school buildings was erected in the summer of 1878, at a cost of $1,600. and is a fine two-story structure.  The building which is now the Central House, was erected in 1878, for a private residence.  In 1879, it was purchased by Grove Hemsley, and used as a boarding house one year, when it was enlarged, and has since been used as a hotel, under the efficient management of Frank Mellen, who is still the proprietor.  The Valley Springs Cemetery Association was organized May 2, 1879, and the grounds are located on the southeast quarter of section 3, and contain ten acres.

 

BEN CLARE.

 

     Ben Clare is a station on the Illinois Central railroad, located on the northeast quarter of the southeast quarter of section thirty-three, in Valley Springs township.  It is the first station on this line of road in the state, and is nicely located.  At the present time there are only a few buildings at Ben Clare, but the surrounding county is occupied by prosperous farmers, and in the near future a thrifty village is sure to grow up.  It has two grain warehouses, a general store, blacksmith shop, and a Methodist church building, besides the depot.  A post office was established soon after the railroad station was located.  I.G. Woodward was the first postmaster, but since his resignation Henry Doman, Frank Bowen and Severt Severson have held the office in the order named. 

  

  

 

 

CHURCHES.

 

     METHODIST EPISCOPAL CHURCH.—A church was organized at Ben Clare in the spring of 1890, which was called the Ben Clare Methodist Episcopal Church, with a membership of thirty-five.  During the fall of 1893, a handsome church building was erected east of the town site of Ben Clare, at a cost of about $2,000, which was principally paid by the members of the church.  It was dedicated on Sunday, January 14, 1894.  The following ministers have had charge of the church:  the Reverends H.B. Green, H.B. Clearwater, S.S. Hookland, S.C. Olds, G.W. Shindlar, E. Honeywell, Nathan Fawell, H.C. Eberhart and Thomas Morris.  Services are held in the church every two weeks.  Sunday school is held every Sunday, with an average attendance of forty-five.  A Woman’s Aid society and a Chapter of the Epworth League are also connected with the church. 

     BEAVER VALLEY SWEDISH LUTHERAN CHURCH.—This church was organized in 1875 by the Rev. C.W. Wretloff.  Services were held in the school house until in 1880, when a large and commodious church building was erected on the northwest quarter of section 6 in Valley Springs, at a cost of two thousand five hundred dollars.  A parsonage was also built near the church, at a cost of one thousand three hundred and fifty dollars.  The following ministers have succeeded Mr. Wretloff, in the order named:  J.H. Randall, A. Sundberg, Dr. C. J. Ellofson, and Rev. Sundquist, who is the present pastor.  Services are held every Sunday, and a membership of the church is about two hundred.  There is a Sunday school connected with the church, with an average attendance of about fifty scholars, also a Christian Endeavor and Young People’s society.

LIST OF TOWNSHIP OFFICERS 1881-1899.

 

     The first meeting of the town board was held January 10, 1881.  The supervisors were J.E. Hallett, chairman, S.A. Johnson and A. T. Arneson; clerk, George Cassady; assessor, W.G. Butterfield. 

     1882.  Supervisors, J.R.Jackson, chairman, Arne T. Arneson, Tolle J. Bye; clerk, George Cassady.  At a meeting of the board April 15, smallpox having broken out in the township, several stringent orders were made to prevent the spread of the disease.  Special constables were appointed to enforce the orders made.  May 8, D.B. Cook was paid $350 for building a bridge over Beaver creek. 

     1883.  Supervisors, Rolla Burkhold, chairman, Arne T. Arneson, Madison Bennett; clerk, Charles P. Bissell; assessor, F.C. Bell; treasurer, W.H. Riddell; justice, D.B. Cook; constable, C.J. Conway.  June, 5, C.P. Bissell resigned as clerk, and George Cassady was appointed. 

     1884.  Supervisors, W.R. Burkholder, chairman, S.A. Johnson, Madison Bennett; clerk, W. H. Gibbs; treasurer, Geo. Cassady; assessor, D.B. Cook; justice, A.C. Gibbs; constable, W. J. Carey. 

     1885.  Supervisors, W.R. Burkholder, chairman; Madison Bennett, S.A. Johnson; clerk, W. H. Gibbs; treasurer, Geo. Cassady; assessor, C.C. Snook; justice, A.C. Gibbs. 

     1886.  Supervisors, W.R. Burkhold, chairman, Madison Bennett, S.A. Johnson; clerk, W.H. Gibbs; treasurer, Geo. Cassady; assessor, D.W. Lawrence; justice, Lewis Spawn; constable, Joe Carle.  October 26, M.H. Gibbs resigned, and W.H. Riddle was appointed clerk. 

     1887.  Supervisors, W.R. Burkholder, chairman, Madison Bennett, Olof Olson; clerk, W.H. Riddell; treasurer, Geo. Cassady; assessor, F.M. Bunn; justice, J.L. Harrington; constable, W.J. Carey. 

     1888.  Supervisors, Charles Harvey, chairman.  Olof Olson, Madison Bennett; clerk, W. H. Riddle; treasurer, Geo. Cassady; assessor, Henry Howe; justice, Lewis Spawn; constables, W.J. Carey and C.D. Scheffer. 

     1889.  Supervisors, Charles Harvey, chairman, Olof Olson, A. T. Arneson; clerk, W.H. Riddle; treasurer, Geo. Cassady; assessor, Charles Pottinger; justices, J.H. Harrington and Geo. Rockwood, but Mr. Rockwood failed to qualify, and C.J. Conway was appointed. 

     1890.  Supervisors, Charles Harvey, chairman, Olof Olson, J.G. Kkimball; clerk, Louis Hetland; assessor, Charles Pottinger; treasurer, E.W. Schmidt; justices, I.C. Woodard and J.D. Burghardt; constable, C.J. Conway.  I.C. Woodard died,a nd William Oakes was appointed to fill the vacancy. 

     1891.  Supervisors, Charles Harvey, chairman, J.G. Kimball, Olof Olson; clerk, L.S. Hetland; treasurer, E.W. Schmidt; assessor, F.M. Bunn; justices, W.H. Riddle and W.F. Oakes; constable, J.J. Urquart. 

     1892.  Supervisors, Henry Howe, chairman, Madison Bennett and Charles Haight; P.E. Howe, clerk; W.H. James, treasurer; Harry Kiffe, assessor; Charles Harvey, justice; Charles Fish, constable. 

     1893.  Supervisors, P.E. Howe, chairman, A.E. Rockwood and Milton Wright; Geo. Wright, clerk; E.W. Schmidt, treasurer; Harry Kiffe, assessor; F.M. Bunn, justice; J.J. Urquhart and Byron Whitney, constables. 

     1894.  Supervisors, J.D. Burghardt, chairman, Frank Allen and L.G. Carlstrom; G.W. Wright, clerk; E.W. Schmidt, treasurer; Charles Harvey, assessor. 

     1895.  Supervisors, J.D. Burghardt, chairman, Frank Allen and L.G. Carlstrom; P.E. Howe, clerk; Charles Haight, treasurer; Charles Harvey, assessor. 

     1896.  Supervisors, Frank Allen, chairman, Olof Olson and John H. Johnson; P.E. Howe, clerk; S.A. Johnson, treasurer; Charles Harvey, assessor. 

     1897.  Supervisors, Frank Allen, chairman, Olof Olson and John H. Johnson; P.E. Howe, clerk; S.A. Johnson, treasurer; Charles Harvey, assessor. 

     1898.  Supervisors, Olof Olson, chairman, George K. Rockwood and Madison Bennett; Perry E. Howe, clerk; S.A. Johnson, treasurer; Henry Harvey, assessor. 

     1899.  Supervisors, Olof Olson, chairman, George K. Rockwood and Madison Bennett; Perry E. Howe, clerk; S.A. Johnson, treasurer; Henry Harvey, assessor.

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES.

 

     ANDERSON, AUGUST, was born in Sweden in 1841.  He emigrated to the United States in 1869, and worked as carpenter in Sioux City, Iowa, until 1872, when he decided to brave the hardships of pioneer life, and removed to Dakota.  He located in this county, taking up a homestead and tree claim in Red Rock township, which he afterwards sold to Axel Olson, and now resides on his farm in section 7 in Valley Springs.  He has a good farm, is well thought of by his neighbors, and is a good citizen. 

     ANDERSON, FRANK, was born in Nassjo, Sweden, in 1849.  Came to Minnehaha county in 1871, and secured a homestead and tree claim comprising 320 acres in section 7 in Valley Springs, where he resided until his death, which occurred on the 25th day of April, 1895.  On that day he and two of his sons had been at work on a quarter section of land which he owned in section nine, and they were just starting for home when a severe thunderstorm came up and he was struck by lightening and instantly killed.  He was a very industrious hardworking, honest man, and greatly respected by his neighbors.  He had accumulated considerable property and left his family, consisting of his wife and ten children, well provided for. 

     ANDERSON, MARTIN, was born on the Lofoden Island in Norway, September 20, 1859.  He emigrated to the United states in 1868; resided in Iowa for eleven years, and removed from there and settled in this county in March, 1879.  He secured the northeast quarter of section 29, in Valley Springs where he now resides, and has a good farm with good buildings. He is also the owner of the southeast quarter of the same section.  He is a good citizen. 

     ARNESON, ARNE T., was born in Norway June 25, 1842.  He emigrated to the United States in July, 1863, and died at Valley Springs November 13, 1894.  When he first arrived in this country he enlisted in the military service, and served until the close of the war.  He then settled in Fillmore county, Minnesota, and engaged in farming until 1874, when he removed to Valley Springs in this county.  He took up the northwest quarter of section 34 as a homestead, and the northeast quarter of section 21 as a tree claim.  He was a very industrious man and a good farmer, and he soon transformed the naked prairie into one of the most comfortable homes in the county.  He had the confidence of his neighbors and townsmen, and was frequently chosen to fill the offices of his school district and township.  He was a large-hearted man, thoroughly honest and upright, and his death in the prime of manhood was deeply regretted by all who knew him. 

     BYE, TOLLE J., was born in Norway January 14, 1845.  He emigrated to the United States in 1869, and lived in Sioux City, Ia., and Canton, S.D., before coming to this county in 1873.  At that time he took up a homestead and a tree claim, but afterwards sold his homestead, and now resides on his tree claim, the southwest quarter of section 5, in Valley Springs.  He also bought 160 acres of school land in section 16, in the same township, and has a good farm.  He was a member of the town board in 1882, is a thrifty farmer, and good citizen. 

     BENNETT, MADISON, was born in Ohio in 1851, but moved with his parents to Wisconsin in 1855, and to Iowa in 1858, where he received his education and resided until June, 1872, when he removed to this county and located in Valley Springs.  He took up as a homestead the northeast quarter of section 30, and has now a farm of 320 acres, well improved.  He has been a member of the town board, is a good farmer and a respected citizen. 

     DANIELSON, STEPHEN, was born in Sweden in 1840.  He emigrated to Wisconsin in 1869; removed from there in 1871, and settled in Minnehaha county.  He took up as a homestead the southeast quarter of section 6, in Valley Springs, where he still resides and has a well improved farm with good buildings.  He is an enterprising farmer and a good citizen. 

     DOMAN, LEWIS FRANKLIN, was born in McLean county, Illinois, in 1856.  He lived there and in Iowa and Kansas before coming to this county, where he located in the fall of 1887.  He is the owner of four hundred and eighty acres of land in sections 20 and 27 in Valley Springs, where he resides and has a good farm. 

     HARVEY, CHARLES, is a native of Ohio, and was born in 1851.  He lived in Winneshiek county, Iowa, eighteen years, and removed to this county in 1873.  He then located upon his present farm, the southeast quarter of section 28, in Valley Springs, which he proved up as a homestead.  It is now a first-class farm, with good buildings.  Mr. Harvey is a good farmer and a good citizen, and has been chairman of the town board and assessor several years. 

     HOWE, PERRY E., was born January 28, 1851, in Cattaraugus county, New York; was educated in the pubic schools and at a private academy, where he studied surveying.  His father was a surveyor, and at the age of twenty years the subject of this sketch commenced surveying, and continued in this employment until he removed to Dakota.  On the 24th day of March, 1873, he arrived in this county and settled in Valley Springs, securing the northwest quarter of section 4, where he now resides, engaged principally in farming and has a good farm.  He has held the office of county surveyor; has been chairman of the township board, and clerk of the same for the last five years.  He is an obliging neighbor, and a respected citizen. 

     JOHNSON, GUSTAF, was born March 31, 1840, in the city of Jonkoping, Sweden.  In 1872 he emigrated to the United States, and lived in New York and Connecticut, and removed to Dakota and located in this county in the fall of 1877, where he has since resided.  He took up as a homestead the northeast quarter of section 6, in Valley Springs, where he engaged in farming, and now has a well improved farm, with good buildings. He is a good reliable citizen. 

     JOHNSON, JOHN O., was born July 2, 1843, in Wisconsin, and came to this county in September, 1873, and settled in Valley Springs.  He took up as a homestead the northeast quarter of section 33, and as a tree claim the northwest quarter of the same section, where he resided until August 3, 1896, when he was accidentally killed. He held various town offices and was an enterprising and respected citizen.  During the civil war he enlisted in Company A, 4th Wisconsin regiment for three months, and at the expiration of that time re-enlisted in the same regiment for three years.  Upon the capture of New Orleans this company took possession of the post office, and Company A was quartered in the office.  Mr. Johnson said that his company could read any letter received at the office, no matter in what language it was written.  During the whole time of his military service he was neither wounded, taken prisoner nor in a hospital. 

     JOHNSON, S.A., is a native of Sweden and was born in 1845.  He has been a well known resident of this county since 1870, at which time he came here from Iowa where he first located after coming to the United States.  He has been a successful farmer, and owns at the present time about four hundred acres of land in Valley Springs.  He resides on his homestead in section 7, which is a good farm with substantial buildings.  He has held several town and school offices, and is an enterprising and respected citizen. 

     LARSON, ALFRED J., is one of the pioneer settlers, having lived on his present homestead on the southwest quarter of section 8 in Valley Springs since 1870.  He has a good farm of 280 acres under good cultivation and well supplied with good buildings.  He was constable in Valley Springs in 1876, is a good farmer and a respected citizen.  He was born in Sweden in 1849, and resided there and in New Jersey and Iowa before coming to this county. 

     OLESON, OLOF, was born in Sweden in 1840.  He emigrated to the United States and lived in New York, Connecticut, Illinois, Wisconsin and Iowa before he settled on his present farm in this county in 1872.  He took up as a homestead the southwest quarter of section 9 in Valley Springs, and like many other early settlers had nothing to begin with, yet to-day he is the owner of a well improved farm of 240 acres with substantial buildings and farm machinery and a large life stock, all of which are unencumbered.  He is a good farmer and good citizen, and has held the office of town supervisor for several years. 

     SCOTT, JOHN, is a comparatively new settler of this county, having come here in March, 1888.  He formerly lived in Ohio, where he was born December 21, 1854; and also resided in Illinois and Iowa for some time.  He bought his present farm, containing over 300 acres in sections 27 and 34 in Valley Springs, and resides there engaged in farming.  He is a thrifty, successful farmer, has one of the best farms in the county, with substantial buildings and other improvements, and well stocked, and during the season of 1898 raised nearly 10,000 bushels of grain on his farm. 

     SEVERSON, SEVERT, is a native of Norway, and was born August 29, 1863.  He emigrated to the United States in 1884 and arrived in Dell Rapids on the 13th day of April, that year.  He is now a resident of Ben Clare, and has been in trade at that place since April, 1894.  He has been postmaster at Ben Clare since May 6, 1894, is a good citizen and enjoys the esteem of his neighbors. 

     SPAWN, LEWIS, was born in Albany county, New York, March 24, 1844.  He lived there and in Illinois and Iowa until he removed to this county where he arrived June 1, 1873.  He filed a homestead and a tree claim upon the northeast quarter of section 31, and the southwest quarter of section 30, in Valley Springs.  For several years he resided on his homestead and during that time held several township offices, and that of justice of the peace for ten years.  A few years ago he removed to Brant Lake, S.D., where he is proprietor of a hotel.  He is an active enterprising citizen. 

     WRIGHT, MILTON, was born in Iowa in 1845.  He resided in Iowa and worked on a farm until he removed to Valley Springs in 1882.  He bought and now owns a good farm in sections 29 and 30, and is a dealer in live stock.  He has held several township offices, and is an active, enterprising and respected citizen. 

  

  

 

VILLAGE OF VALLEY SPRINGS.

 

     The village of Valley Springs is pleasantly and favorably located both for residence and business purposes, and since the location of the station on the Omaha line in 1878 its population and business have been steadily increasing. 

At a session of the territorial legislature in 1879, an act was passed authorizing the incorporation of the village of Valley Springs, but the people did not perfect an organization under its provision. 

In 1883 another act of incorporation was passed.  The territory comprised the south half of the south half of section 34, and the southeast quarter of the southeast quarter of section 33 in Red Tock township, and all of section 3, and the east half of the east half of section 4 in Valley Springs township, making in all a little over 1100 acres of land.  This territory of the village has been greatly reduced, and comprises at the present writing only the south half of the northwest quarter and the north half of the southwest quarter of section 3 in Valley Springs township.  The charter was nearly the same in its provisions as the one incorporating the village of Sioux Falls; in fact, all the village charters granted in territorial days were similar in character.  The government of the corporation and the management of its affairs were vested in a president, who was ex officio a trustee, and four trustees.  The other elective officers were clerk, treasurer, and village justice of the peace.  The board of trustees was empowered to appoint and remove at pleasure a chief of the fire department, a fire warden, attorney, street commissioner, and marshal.  The annual election was directed to be held on the first Tuesday in March. 

The first election was held on the 6th day of March, 1883.  Forty-six votes were cast, and the following named persons were elected:  W.H. Riddell, president, J.E. Hallett, Paul Zimmerman, J. Dunham, and Geo. Cassady, trustees; F. Mellen, justice of the peace; D.B. Cook, treasurer; F.C. Bell, clerk.  D.B. Cook declined to qualify, and Richard Barnett was appointed.  Henry Howe was appointed marshal.  During the summer a village jail was built. 

In March, 1884, the village license for saloon keepers from April, 1884, to January 1, 1885, was fixed at $75.  In December the license was fixed at $200 per year.  In December, 1885, the saloon license was fixed at $600. 

In 1886, two cisterns were built, of a capacity of 200 bbls. Each, at a cost of $230, and 320 of feet of hose and other fire apparatus purchased.  A town hall and engine room were built, at a cost of $914, and a fire department was organized on the 10th day of June, 1886, with twenty-eight members and W.R. Burkholder as chief. 

On the 6th day of August, 1888, a special election was held to determine whether the village should issue bonds in the sum of $800 to pay the indebtedness of the village incurred in building engine room and hall.  The vote cast was thirty-four for, and one against the issuing of bonds, and the bonds were issued.  In December the saloon license was fixed at $700. 

As time progressed, the people of the village desired some amendments to the charter, but as this could not be accomplished by legislation, and the provisions of the general law for the incorporation of municipal bodies were more to their liking, the village board on the 4th day of March, 1895, took the necessary steps and dissolved the corporation of the village, and reincorporated under the general law as the Town of Valley Springs. 

There is not a village in the state that has a better grade of schools, and a higher percentage of church-going people.  It has three church organizations, but no saloon, three resident ministers, but no lawyer.  Its business men are thrifty and enterprising, and but few have fallen by the wayside. 

The village has outgrown the two story school building which was erected in 1878, at a cost of $1,600, and the old bank building is rented for one department.  At the present time 109 scholars are enrolled in the three departments into which the school is divided.  The number of scholars of school age within the village limits is 137.  Three teachers are employed, and Prof. J.A. Ross, one of the best and most efficient teachers in the county, is in charge of the school. 

All lines of business usually found in villages of the size of Valley Springs, are not only well represented, but there are some enterprises of which the people are justly proud.  In 1878, L.K. Lee, then a resident of Valley Springs, built a flouring mill of 100-barrel capacity.  It is a first-class mill in every detail, and its product grades high upon the market.  He also built an elevator of upwards of 30,000 bushel capacity.  The mill has been owned and successfully operated by the Valley Springs Roller Mill Company since 1893.  The Hubbard & Palmer Elevator Company handles grain at this point, and the capacity of their elevator is ample to meet the demands of its patrons. 

In June, 1896, the Valley Springs Creamery Company was organized.  It is not incorporated, but is organized on the co-operative plan.  At the present time there are upwards of seventy-five shareholders.  The public-spirited citizens of the village, in order to aid in the project, adopted a novel plan of procedure.  They organized the Valley Springs Building Association, with shares of stock at twenty-five dollars each, and secured $1,000 in this way, which was used in erecting a creamery building.  The use of this building was given to the creamery company free of charge as long as it was operated as a creamery.  During the year 1898 the company paid $8,945.69 for 1,469,273 lbs. of milk.  From this milk 63,895 lbs. of butter was made, which was sold for $10,946.64.  The whole cost of the plant, including a skimming station at Corson, is a little upwards of $3,000.  It has three separators, and so far has been running at only about one-half its capacity.  It has been well conducted, and is under able management.  J.J. Urquhart is president, Tolle J. Bye vice president, J.G. Kimball secretary and manager, Charles Lathrop treasurer and L. Christianson buttermaker. 

To summarize—Valley Springs has good educational advantages and church privileges, excellent business facilities, and a thrifty, enterprising, honest class of citizens.

 

NEWSPAPERS.

 

     VALLEY SPRINGS ENTERPRISE.—This was the first newspaper published in Valley Springs.  T.J. Martin was the proprietor and editor, and for several years published a good local paper, but removed to Toledo, Ohio, in 1890, where he published  a newspaper until his death, which occurred December 19, 1897. 

     VALLEY SPRINGS VIDETTE.—In the summer of 1891, the Valley Springs Publishing Company was organized, and the last week in September of that year the first issue of the Valley Springs Vidette appeared. The following March, Charles E. Hill assumed the editorial control and management of the Vidette, and since then it has been a good local newspaper, is well patronized, and a credit to the town.

CHURCHES.

 

     CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH.—A Congregational church was organized at Valley Springs June 11, 1878, with a membership of thirteen.  In 1884 a commodious church building was erected at a cost of about $2,000, which was all paid during the same year, $500 having been granted by the Congregational Church Building Society, and the balance raised by members and friends.  The building was dedicated November 2, 1884.  The following ministers have acted as pastors of the church in the order named:  The Revs. J.A. Palmer, S.F. Roby, H.G. Miller, D.H. Clapp, C.W. Wiley, W.H. Watson, W. Mooney, B.F. Marsden, M.A. Ball, W.C. Gilmore.  Services are held morning and evening every Sunday, and a Ladies’ Aid society, a Missionary society and a Sunday school, with an average attendance of fifty, are connected with this church.  The present membership of the church is fifty-one. 

     FREE WILL BAPTIST CHURCH.—This church was organized May 31, 1885, with three members.  In 1886 the Rev. J.J. Hull became its pastor, and a church building was erected that year at a cost of about $1,000.  In April, 1890, after having built up a very prosperous church, he was succeeded by the Rev. R.A. Coats, who remained until the fall of 1893, when he accepted a call from Estherville, Iowa, and the Rev. George W. Mathews became its pastor.  In 1895 the Rev. R.A. Coats returned to Valley Springs and again assumed the duties of pastor of this church.  He was succeeded by the Rev. M.W. Dodge and in 1899 Mr. Dodge was succeeded by Rev. M.L. Dewey.  The membership is now seventy-seven, and there are two Aid societies and a Sunday school of one hundred members connected with this church. 

     THE METHODIST EPISCOPAL CHURCH.—This church has an organization, but no church building. The pulpit is supplied by the Rev. T. Morris, and a church building is soon to be erected.

FRATERNAL SOCIETIES.

 

     KNIGNTS OF PYTHIAS.—A lodge of this order was instituted about ten years ago, and has at the present writing thirty members.  The officers are:  Dr. Geo. W. Bliss, C.C.; E.B. Palmer, V.C.; F.M. Eastman, P.; J.J. Urquhart, M.of E.; E.A. Harris, M.of F.; W.R. Brill, M.of A.; L.S. Hetland, K.of R. 

     MODERN WOODMEN.—This organization was effected about three years ago, and is in a flourishing condition.  Its present officers are:  Lew Allen, venerable counsel; D.A. Shaffer, worthy adviser; Archie Kimball, clerk; E.A. Harris, banker; Wm. Brill, escort; Steve Markuson, watchman; Eli Jones, sentinel. 

     ROYAL NEIGHBORS OF AMERICA.—An organization of the R.N. A., a companion of the Modern Woodmen, is one of the societies existing at Valley Springs.  The officers are:  Mrs. Cora Brill, oracle; Mrs. Elizabeth Bell, V.O.; Miss Winnie Pinney, M.; Mrs. Alma Markuson, R.P.O. 

     FRATERNAL BROTHERHOOD OF THE WORLD.—This order has recently established a branch office in Valley Springs with the following officers:  Dr. Geo. W. Bliss, president; Mrs. Geo. W. Bliss, V.C.; H.A. Cadwell, escort; Charles Pottinger, clerk; M.L. Riley, overseer; R.P. Cadwell, Past P.

OFFICERS OF THE VILLAGE OF VALLEY SPRINGS, FROM 1883 TO 1895 AND OF THE TOWN OF VALLEY SPRINGS FROM 1895 TO 1899.

 

     1883.  W.H. Riddell, president; J.E. Hallet, Paul Zimmermann, J. Dunham and Geo. Cassady, trustees; F. Mellen, justice; D.B. Cook, treasurer; F.C. Bell, clerk; Henry Howe, marshal; Charles Harvey, street commissioner.  D.B. Cook declined to act as treasurer and R. Barnett was appointed. 

     1884.  W.H. Riddell, president; J.E. Hallett, P. Zimmerman, Geo. Cassady and J. Dunham, trustees; F. Mellen, justice; F.C. Bell, clerk; Richard Barnett, treasurer; Edson Wheeler, marshal and street commissioner. 

     1885.  J.E. Hallett, president; T.B. Riley, F.C. Bell, F. Eastman and C. Pottinger, trustees; D.W. Lawrence, clerk; Z.R. Biggs, justice; R. Barnett, treasurer; Charles Harvey, street commissioner; Edson Wheeler, marshal. 

     1886.  J.C. Shephard, president; Geo. Cassady, W.H. Riddell, G.W. Wright and Charles Harvey, trustees; L.P. Mosier, justice; C. Barnett, treasurer; D.W. Lawrence, assessor; clerk, T.J. Martin; Edson Wheeler, marshal. 

     1887.  A.L. Whaley, president; G.W. Wright, Charles Harvey, John Bowman and J.L. Harrington, trustees; W.A. Hill, clerk, Richard Barnett, treasurer; L.P. Mosier, justice; Charles Bender, marshal. 

     1888.  G.W. Wright, president; N.J. Deisher, J. Bowman, Charles Harvey and Charles Eschels, trustees; Dell Hill, clerk; H. Howe, justice; Richard Barnett, treasurer; J.D. Burghardt, marshal.  July 9, H. Howe resigned and J.L. Harrington was appointed justice. 

     1889.  G.W. Wright, president; N.J. Deisher, M.H. Gibbs, H.D. Kenyon and Charles Harvey, trustees; J.D. Burghardt, justice; E.W. Schmidt, treasurer; W.H. Riddell, clerk; James Eschels, marshal. 

     1890.  L.K. Kee, president; Eli Jones, Richard Barnett, T.B. Riley and J.C. Kimball, trustees; Geo. Wright, clerk; E.W. Schmidt, treasurer; W.H. Riddell, justice; James Eschels, marshal. 

     1891.  Geo. Cassady, president; T.B. Riley, J.G. Kimball, Eli Jones and R. Barnett, trustees; E.W. Schmidt, treasurer; J.D. Burghardt, justice; W.H. James, clerk; John Conover, marshal. 

     1892.  Geo. Cassady, president; R. Barnett, Eli Jones, T.B. Riley and T.R. Haight, trustees; W.H. James, clerk; E.W. Schmidt, treasurer; C. Pottinger, justice. 

     1893.  C. Dillon, president; G. Hullett, Eli Jones, W.A. Hill and J.G. Kimball, trustees; G.W. Wright, clerk; E.W. Schmidt, treasurer; C. Pottinger, justice. 

     1894.  F.M. Eastman, president; T.D. Haight, Geo. Cassady, F.L. Skillman and O. A. Hulett, trustees; E.W. Schmidt, treasurer, W.H. James, clerk; C.C. Pottinger, justice. 

     1895.  W.J. Carey, president; W.G. Ely, T.D. Haight, F.L. Skillman and G.W. Wright, trustees; W.H. James, clerk; N.J. Deisher, treasurer; James Jameson, assessor; J.D. Burghardt, justice. 

     1896.  W.J. Carey, president; James Eschels, E.A. Harris, Charles E. Hill and T.B. Riley, trustees; W.H. James, clerk; F.M. Eastman, justice. 

     1897.  Charles Haight, president; L.S. Hetland, Charles Pottinger, and James Eschels, trustees; W.H. James, clerk; F.L. Skillman, treasurer; James Jameson, assessor; Frank M. Eastman, justice. 

     1898.  Charles Haight, president; L.S.Hetland, Charles Pottinger, and James Eschels, trustees; H.W. Ferguson, clerk; F.L. Skillman, treasurer; Wm. Brill, marshal; Frank M. Eastman, justice. 

     1899.  E.W. Schmidt, president; E.A. Harris, L.S. Hetland, James Eschels and Sander Swenson, trustees; W.C. Gilmore, clerk; F.L. Skillman, treasurer; F.M. Eastman, justice; Wm. Brill, marshal.

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES.

 

     BURGHARDT, J. DeWITT, is a native of Broome county, New York, and was born January 12, 1852.  He lived there until he removed to Valley Springs in May, 1881.  He resided in Red Rock township for a few years, and there held the office of justice of the peace for three years, and has also held the same office in Valley Springs for the same length of time.  He has for several years been engaged in the implement business in the village of Valley Springs, and is well liked as a neighbor and citizen. 

     BURKHOLDER, ROLLA W., was born at Carlisle, Pa., February 6, 1854; attended the city schools until fifteen years of age; then was employed in a general store five years, and in a grocery store seven years; in 1881 removed to this county, and located in Valley Springs on July 4, and opened a hardware and general store; in 1886, sold out, and engaged in the collection business until 1890, when he was employed for three years in the Indian service at the Lower Brule Agency; at the expiration of that time he returned to Valley Springs, and has been engaged in farming since then.  Mr. Burkholder has been chairman of the board of supervisors in Valley Springs township several years.  He is a man of positive characteristics, never on the fence, outspoken upon all public questions, and a participator in all local matter, a good neighbor, and a good citizen. 

     CASSADY, GEORGE, is a native of Harrison, Ohio, and was born in 1849.  He resided for some time in Indiana and Minnesota and came to Valley Springs in this county in June, 1878, where he has since resided.  Soon after the railroad station was established at Valley Springs he was appointed station agent there, and has held this position since that time.  He has been president of the village four years, a member of the school board nearly all the time since his residence there, and town and school treasurer for several years.  His careful, conservative business qualifications, together with his honesty of purpose and genial manners, have made him one of the most respected citizens of the county. 

     CONOVER, JOHN, was born in Onondaga county, New York, September 16, 1843, and was reared on a farm and educated in the district schools.  During the rebellion he enlisted in the First New York Light Artillery for three years, but after thirteen months of service was discharged for disability.  He again enlisted in the Ninth New York Heavy Artillery for one year, serving ten months and until the close of the war.  For a few years he resided in Minnesota, but removed from there to Red Rock, this county, in 1883.  He now resides in Valley Springs. 

     DEISHER, N.J., was born in Lycoming county, Pennsylvania, September 24, 1854.  He resided there and in Illinois and Nebraska before his coming to this county in March, 1886.  He located at Valley Springs, where he engaged in the banking business until 1895, when he removed from the state.  Mr. Deisher was a very active citizen while a resident of the county, and he enjoys the distinction of being the first banker in Valley Springs. 

     DUNHAM, JONATHAN, is a native of Tompkins county, New York, and was born September 24, 1821.  Mr. Dunham is one of the residents of this county who is qualified to speak of its comparative merits, having lived, in addition to his native state, in Canada, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Indiana, and Illinois before coming here.  In 1872 he arrived in Sioux Falls, and very soon thereafter took up the east half of section 3 in Valley Springs as a homestead and by pre-emption, and also secured 160 acres in section 27 in Red Rock under the tree culture act.  He has now 500 acres of farm land.  Mr. Dunham since coming to Dakota has attended strictly to business, and although an active citizen and interested in all public matters, has not been a candidate for office.  He is an independent conservative man, but considerate of the opinion of those who differ with him.  His rights of citizenship are conscientiously exercised, and his influence is felt in all local matters. 

     EASTMAN, FRANCIS M., was born in Wisconsin, August 2, 1850.  After starting out in life for himself he spent a few years in Minnesota but removed to this county in 1876, arriving in Palisade on the 12th day of March of that year.  He took up a quarter section of land as a homestead in section 33, and a tree claim in section 8 in Red Rock township, both of which he has disposed of, and now resides in Valley Springs.  He was assessor of Palisade in 1881, president of the village of Valley Springs in 1894, and justice of the peace since 1896.  He is a good neighbor and a good citizen. 

     HAIGHT, CHARLES, was born in Gloversville, Fulton county, New York, July 10, 1852.  He resided in his native state and in Indiana and Illinois until 1889.  On the 20th day of April of that year he came to Valley Springs, and since then has been in business at that place.  He is associated with T.D. Haight under the firm name of T.D. & C. Haight, and the firm is engaged in the hardware, grocery, harness, and boot and shoe business.  The firm has been successful, and is doing a good business.  Mr. Haight has the respect of the citizens of Valley Springs, and has been elected to school, village and township offices, in all of which he has proved to himself to be a good official. 

     HAIGHT, T.D., is a native of Albany, New York, and was born 1834.  After having lived in Indiana and Virginia he removed to Dakota and located at Valley Springs in May, 1888.  In October of that year he entered into a co-partnership with his brother, C. Haight, under the firm name of T.D. & C. Haight and bought a stock of hardware of Ed Wheeler, who was then doing business at Valley Springs, and also the grocery stock of Carl Chapman, to which they added the sale of boots and shoes, trunks and harnesses.  Mr. Haight is a good business man and the firm has done a successful business.  He is a good, reliable citizen. 

     HARVEY, WILLIAM, was born in Caledonia county, Vermont, on the 1st day of April, 1817, and died at Valley Springs on the 28th day of April, 1895.  He was a physician of the old school, and practiced his profession in Ohio and Iowa before coming to Dakota.  He arrived in this county in June, 1876, and settled in Valley Springs, taking up a homestead in section 19.  He continued the practice of medicine a few years, but gradually retired from this work as old age advanced.  He was well liked by his neighbors and was a kind, genial gentleman. 

     HETLAND, L.S., is a native of Norway, and was born April 21, 1858.  He emigrated to the United States in 1872, and resided in Illinois until the fall of 1879, at which time he removed to Dakota and located at Valley Springs.  In 1885 he engaged in general merchandizing in the village of Valley Springs in which he has since continued.  He is a good business man, and has made a success of his business.  He has held the office of clerk of the town board for two years, was one of the trustees of the village of Valley Springs in 1898, and is one of the best citizens in the village, well liked by his neighbors and customers. 

     HILL, CHARLES E., was born in Greene county, Ohio, December 1, 1854, and raised in Cleveland, Ohio, where he was educated in the city schools.  He learned the printer’s trade, on the Cleveland (Ohio) Herald.  After learning his trade he concluded he would see something of the world before settling down, and he traveled throughout the United States, Canada, Cuba and England, working at his trade for a livelihood.  He arrived in Sioux Falls in 1891, and worked for awhile on the Press.  In March, 1892, he married Mrs. Emma A. Pixley of Valley Springs, and became the proprietor of the Valley Springs Hotel, and editor of the Valley Springs Vidette, but sold out the hotel business in the fall of 1892, and since that time has given his undivided attention to the management of the Vidette.  He is a good newspaper man, and the Vidette has grown to be a good county paper under his editorial control. 

     HUNT, WASHINGTON J., was born in Chenango county, New York, February 23, 1856.  He removed with his parent to Fayette, Fayette county, Iowa, in 1857, and resided there until he was twenty-two years of age, working on a farm and attending the common schools and the Iowa University.  At that age he commenced work as a mason, and followed this trade until he removed to Dakota, where he arrived September 19, 1878.  He then took up the northeast quarter of section 14 in Clear Lake, this county, and resided there until 1887, when he removed to Sioux Falls.  In 1889 he removed to East Sioux Falls, where he resided, until November, 1898, when he located at Valley Springs.  While a resident of Clear Lake he was a justice of the peace seven years, and town clerk five years.  He has taught at least fifteen terms of school in this county, and has proved himself to be a successful teacher.  He was county superintendent of schools of Minnehaha county in 1893 and 1894, and faithfully performed the duties of the office, ably assisted by his wife, who is well educated and has been a successful teacher in this county since its pioneer days.  In 1895, Mr. Hunt was elected a member of the city council of East Sioux Falls.  He is an upright, honest man, a good citizen, a kind neighbor, and has a host of friends. 

     JAMES, WILLIAM HENRY, was born in Dodgeville, Wisconsin, December 25, 1858.  He lived in Wisconsin until 1884, engaged in farming and milling, and then removed to Minnesota where he remained until the 15th day of August, 1886.  At that time he located at Valley Springs, and has been engaged in the grain and insurance business at that place since then.  He has held various township and village offices, was clerk of the village board for several years, and made a good official.  Mr. James is a genial, good fellow, a good neighbor and esteemed citizen, and justly popular with all who know him. 

     KIFFE, H., was born in Mankato, Minnesota, April 12, 1857.  He resided in Iowa for a few years, and came from there to Sioux Falls in 1878.  Soon after he took up a homestead in McCook county, this state, and in 1879 removed to Rock county, Minnesota, where he remained ten years.  In 1889 he returned to this county and settled in Valley Springs.  While a resident of Minnesota he held town offices for several years.  He is an industrious honest citizen. 

     KINYON, HOLDEN D., was born in Dodge county Wisconsin, September 15, 1854, and resided there until he removed to this county in March, 1886.  He settled on the southeast quarter of section 18 in Red Rock, and was so pleased with the country that he induced several of his friends and relatives from his old home to come here and locate.  He held several town offices while living in Wisconsin, and also while a resident of Red Rock.  In April, 1890, having removed to Valley Springs village, he was appointed postmaster at that place.  He is a reliable, upright man, and well liked by his neighbors. 

     MELLEN, FRANK, is a native of Boston, Mass., and was born May 18, 1828.  He learned the shoemaker’s trade and worked at it for several years.  Resided for some time in Connecticut, and came from there to this county on the 15th day of August, 1874, and located in Valley Springs, taking up a homestead in section 3 and 10 of that township.  He has resided in the village of Valley Springs since its incorporation, engaged in the hotel business during the entire time.  He has been justice of the peace a good many years, and has practiced law in the justice court since coming to Dakota, and has acquired quite a good knowledge of law.  He is an active, energetic and independent citizen, and is quite a factor in the affairs of the village of Valley Springs. 

     POTTINGER, CHARLES O., was born in South Bend, Indiana, May 4, 1850.  He resided in Illinois and Iowa for several years, but removed from the last named state to Valley Springs in March, 1884.  He held the office of town clerk in Iowa for two years, and since residing in the village of Valley Springs has been assessor and justice of the peace, and one of the trustees of the village since 1897.  He is in the grocery and confectionery business.  He is a quiet, unassuming citizen and respected by his neighbors and acquaintances. 

     RIDDELL, WILLIAM H., was born in Belvidere, Illinois, in 1848, and resided there until he was twenty-one years of age.  He then went to Sheldon, Iowa, where he secured a homestead and engaged in farming until May, 1878, at which time he removed to this county and settled in Valley Springs.  He engaged in the lumber business for nine years, and then in the mercantile business for about three years.  Was township treasurer and clerk, president of the village of Valley Springs, and also a member of the board of education and justice of the peace.  In 1885, was a member of the lower house of the territorial legislature from Minnehaha county.  It is hardly necessary to add that he was a highly respected citizen, and that his departure for Oregon in July, 1892, was greatly regretted by all who had the pleasure of his acquaintance. 

     RILEY, J.W., was born September 15, 1858, in Wisconsin.  In 1867 he removed with his parents to Mason City, Iowa, where he received his education and decided to become a teacher.  In 1876 he finished a course in the high school and since then has devoted his time to educational pursuits.  In 1883 he came to this county, and in October of that year commenced teaching school in the Foster school house in Benton. He remained there three years and then took charge of the Whittier school in Wayne one year.  In 1888 he became principal of the village school at Valley Springs, which position he held until 1897.  He is an enthusiast in his profession, and has done good service in advancing the standing of the schools in this county. In 1896 he was nominated by the Republican party for county superintendent of schools, but the Fusion party polled too many votes for his success at the election. Mr. Riley is a genial, good fellow, and an exemplary citizen. 

     RILEY, THOMAS B., was born at New Albany, Indiana, June 26, 1836; was educated in the city schools, and when eighteen years old entered into a contract for three years as an apprentice to learn the trade of carpenter and joiner.  At the expiration of that time he continued to work at his trade until the breaking out of the civil war, and in 1861 enlisted in Co. F, 59th Indiana, and served until October, 1864.  After his discharge he went to Illinois and engaged in farming until 1883, when he came to Dakota and settled in Valley Springs.  He purchased two quarter sections in Valley Springs township, and one quarter section in Martin township, Rock county, Minnesota. He took up his residence in the village of Valley Springs, and for ten years engaged in the lumber business.  He was one of the trustees of the village several years.  In June, 1898, he removed to Sioux Falls, where he now resides.  He still owns his farms and town property in Valley Springs, is a thorough business man, and a respected citizen. 

     SKILLMAN, F.L., was born in Chenango county, New York, January 21, 1844, and lived there until 1856 when he removed to Wabasha county, Wisconsin.  November 2, 1861, he enlisted in Co. G, 3d Minnesota infantry, and re-enlisted as a veteran in the same regiment in 1863.  In April, 1865, he was promoted to 1st Lieutenant Co. K, 113 U.S.C.T., and remained in the service until September 4, of that year.  After the war he remained in Minnesota until 1879, when he removed to Brookings county, Dakota, and from there to Valley Springs in September, 1886.  His business since coming to Dakota has been that of a druggist. Mr. Skillman is a good business man, and an upright, honest citizen, and his influence is always felt in the furtherance of such projects as promise to elevate the standard of good society in the community in which he lives.  He was one of the trustees of the village of Valley Springs two years, and has been treasurer of the same since 1897. 

     URQUHART, J.J., was born in Cornwall, Canada.  After his coming to the United States he resided in New York and Vermont, and came to Dakota and located at Valley Springs April 1, 1886.  At that time his entire capital consisted of five dollars in cash.  The first summer he worked out by the month, and saved enough money to pay for a marriage license and a few household goods.  In the spring of 1887, he rented a farm for three years, ran in debt for a team, and commenced farming.  At the end of three years he held an auction and sold his stock and machinery, paid his debts and had $1,300 left.  He then bought a house and lot in the village of Valley Springs and commenced clerking for L.S. Hetland.  He has held the office of constable and deputy sheriff.  Mr. Urquhart is an active, energetic business man and a good citizen. 

     WHALEY, ARCHIE L., was born in Oneida county, New York, in September, 1835, and died at the village of Valley Springs, May 6, 1895.  When a mere lad he moved with his parents to Wisconsin, where he was reared on a farm and educated in the common school.  He resided in Iowa twenty-five years engaged in farming.  In May, 1876, he came to this county and settled in Red Rock, taking up a homestead.  When the railroad reached Valley Springs he commenced business there, in which he continued until his decease.  During his residence in Valley Springs he held several official positions; was president of the village and school board, village treasurer, postmaster for four years and deputy postmaster for several years.  He always took quite an interest in political matters, and was frequently a delegate to political conventions.  He was successful in business, and was one of the most noticeable men upon the streets of the village.  He was an enterprising citizen, a kind neighbor and an upright, honest man. 

     WRIGHT, G.W., was born at Ottawa, Canada, September 26, 1860, and emigrated with his parents to the United States in 1862.  In 1873 he came to Luverne, Minnesota, and in June, 1885, removed to this county and located at Valley Springs.  He then engaged in business at that place with A. Peterson, and in the spring of 1886 he bought his partner’s interest and entered into copartnership with W.J. Carey, which continued until 1890.  Soon after the building of the flouring mill at Valley Springs he became the salesman and bookkeeper of that concern.  He has been president of the board of trustees of the village of Valley Springs and clerk of both the village and township.  He is an upright, honest man, and a respected citizen. 

   
 

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