MAPLETON TOWNSHIP

 

(102-49)

 

 

 

     The boundary lines of Mapleton township were surveyed by W.J. Neeley in July, 1859, and the subdivision was made by Carl C.P. Meyer in September, 1864.  According to the government survey the township contains 23,024.50 acres of land.  It is well watered by the Big Sioux river, Slipup creek and their tributaries, and has considerable bottom land, making it as a whole one of the best townships in the county.  The first settlements were made in the northwestern portion of the township, the south half at that time being within the boundaries of the Military Reservation and not subject to settlement.  The first settler was John Nelson, who took up land in section 25 in 1866.  A post office, called Republican, was established in Mapleton township soon after the mail route opened between Sioux Falls and Dell Rapids.  It was located on section 5, and John Nelson was its first postmaster.  In 1882, Ole Gunderson was appointed postmaster and he moved the office to the northwest corner of section 8 where it remained for about twelve years, when Ole O. Gilseth was appointed postmaster and removed the office to his home on section 5 where it is located at this writing.  Owing to its proximity to the city of Sioux Falls the inhabitants of Mapleton avail themselves of the advantages offered by the metropolis.  The township has no churches, public buildings or stores.  The Milwaukee railroad runs through its entire length north and south, and until a station called Renner was established in 1898, on the southwest quarter of section 9, there was no railroad station within its borders.  The proper records show there is a boundary line between Sioux Falls and Mapleton townships, but so far as general business transactions of the inhabitants of the two townships are concerned its existence is not recognized.

 

 

 

 

 

MAPLETON TOWNSHIP BOARD

 

       The records of Mapleton begin March 5, 1881, at which date there was a meeting of the township board at Ole Thompson’s house.  C.G. Coats was chairman and associated with him as supervisors were Iver Nelson and W.J. Crittenden.  At this meeting John Fortune was appointed constable, L. Renner assessor, and C. Moen was the first clerk.

 

       1882. The supervisors were Iver Nelson chairman, Thomas Paulson, Edgar Foster; C. Moen clerk; L. Renner assessor.

 

     1883. Iver Nelson, Thomas Paulson and H.B. Caldwell composed the board of supervisors; Ole Gunderson assessor and justice of the peace.  On the 26th day of May, O.P. Schjodt was appointed clerk.

 

     1884.  At the first March election of township officers the following persons were elected:  Supervisors, Thomas Paulson chairman, Iver Nelson, L. Renner; clerk, O.P. Schjodt; treasurer, G.O. Dalemoe; justice, E.J. Kingsbury; assessor, Ole Gunderson; constables, James Delany, John Fortune.

 

     1885.  Supervisors, Thomas Paulson chairman, Iver Nelson, L. Renner; clerk, O.P. Shcjodt; treasurer, G.O. Dalemoe; assessor, E.J. Kingsbury.

 

     1886. The record was so incomplete for this year that it was impossible to ascertain who the town officials were.

 

     1887.  Supervisors, L. Renner chairman, John Fortune, Thomas Paulson; clerk, O.P. Schjodt; treasurer, Jonas Olson; assessor, Ole Gunderson; justices, H. Tabor, E.J. Kingsbury; constable, E.E. Moen.  June 27, $150 was appropriated and turned over to Iver Nelson to aid in building a bridge across the Sioux river.

 

     1888. Supervisors, L. Renner chairman, John Fortune, Thomas Paulson; clerk, O.P. Schjodt; treasurer, Jonas Olson; assessor, Ole Gunderson; justice, E.J. Kingsbury; constables, David Dickey, T. Hackett.

 

     1889.  Supervisors, L. Renner chairman, Thomas Paulson, Iver Nelson; clerk, O.P. Schjodt; treasurer, Jonas Olson; assessor, Ole Gunderson; justice, H. Tabor; constable, A.J. Aspaas.  It was resolved “that every taxpayer in the township shall be his own poundmaster.”

 

     1890.  Supervisors, Thomas Paulson chairman, L. Renner, Ole Gunderson; clerk, O.P. Schjodt; treasurer, Jonas Olson; assessor, Peter Nelson; justice, Ole Gunderson; constables, Wm. Person, Esten E. Moen.

 

     1891.  Supervisors, J.L. Ingalls chairman, T.I. Sweeting, H. Tabor; clerk, R.M. Seager; treasurer, R.B. Seager; assessor, John Fortune; justices, J. Smith Kirk, M. Caldwell; constables, David Dickey, H. Hackett. April 4, a township meeting was held at the Ingalls school house for the purpose of considering the question of a resurvey of the township, and the following resolution was introduced and voted upon by ballot:  “Resolved that the township be resurveyed in accordance with the original plat, and each section be resurveyed; that the county surveyor be employed to do the work and that the money be raised to cover the expenses.”  The vote was in the affirmative.  Another meeting was held June 24, when it was determined that the section corners upon the highways should be located and landmarks erected at such corners as provided in sections 2 and 3 of chapter 35 of the session laws of 1890; that the surveyor make a legal survey in accordance with the provisions of said chapter 35, and relocated and establish the section and quarter section corners throughout the township as originally established by the United States survey, and that cedar posts be used in marking said corners.  July 7, the board resolved that the noxious weed law should be enforced and that all Russian thistle, cockle burr and Canada thistle within the township should be destroyed before August 15, 1891, and that notices of the action of the board should be published as required by law.

 

     1892. Supervisors, J.L. Ingalls chairman, H. Tabor, T.J. Sweeting; clerk, R.M. Seager; treasurer, R.B. Seager; assessor, Andrew Brende; justice, W. Bliss.  At this election there were 101 ballots cast.  On the 9th day of February, 1893, the township was divided into six road districts.

 

     1893. Supervisors, E. Cornue chairman, Jonas Olson, Iver Nelson; clerk, R.M. Seager; treasurer, R.B. Seager; assessor, A.P. Brende; justices, J. Smith Kirk, L.O. Myrick; constables, James Delaney, Walter Hayward.

 

     1894. Supervisors, Edgar E. Cornue chairman, Jonas Olson, Iver Nelson; clerk, R.M. Seager; treasurer, R.B. Seager; assessor, Andrew Brende.

 

     1895. Supervisors, Edgar E. Cornue chairman, Jonas Olson, Iver Nleosn; clerk, R.M. Seager; treasurer, Esten E. Moen; assessor, Andrew Brende.

 

     1896.  Supervisors, L. Renner chairman, Jonas Olson, Iver Nelson; clerk, R.M. Seager; treasurer, E.E. Moen; assessor, O. P. Schjodt.

 

     1897 and 1898.  Same officers as in 1896.

 

     1899.  Supervisors, L. Renner chairman, Esten E. Moen, Jonas Olson; clerk, R.M. Seager; treasurer, Torsten Olson; assessor, O.P. Schjodt.

 

 

 

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES

 

 

 

    BERG, JENS S., a native of Norway, was born May 29, 1837.  He emigrated to the United States in 1865, and settled in Minnesota.  On the 26th day of July, 1869, he arrived in this county and settled in Mapleton. He took up the southeast quarter of section 30, where he has since resided.  He has a good farm, and is a respected citizen and well liked by his neighbors.

 

       BERG, SIVERT, is a native of Norway, and was born March 3, 1823.  He emigrated to the United States in 1867, and settled in Minnesota for a short time.  From there he removed to Mapleton, this county, and took up the west tier of forties in section 29, where he has since resided.  He has a good farm and is an industrious, good citizen.

 

       DICKEY, DAVID, was born at White Pigeon, Michigan, December 5, 1843.  He resided in the Pennsylvania oil regions several years, then went to Iowa where he resided four years and removed from there to this county in 1879.  He owns a farm of 200 acres in section 18, 19 and 20, in Mapleton, where he has resided several years.  He has held school and township offices, and is a highly respected citizen.

 

       DOWDLE, WILLIAM, was born in Ireland, in October, 1828, and emigrated to the United States in 1845.  He resided for awhile in Pennsylvania, and then came to Minnesota where he remained twenty-five years. In March, 1878, he removed to McCook county, this state, and took up a pre-emption and homestead.  In 1883 came to this county and settled in Mapleton, where he soon became the owner of a large farm, and at the present writing there is nothing to indicate that he will not be able to care for himself for a long time to come.

 

      EGGE, ESTEN E., a native of Norway, was born in 1830.  He emigrated with his family to Goodhue county, Minnesota, in 1865, and resided there until in 1871, when they decided to remove to Dakota.  They started out across the prairie with an ox-team, and it took them sixteen days before they reached this county.  They located in Mapleton on their present homestead in sections 31 and 32, which is now a well improved farm, with a large residence and good outbuildings.  Mr. Egge is a good farmer and a good citizen.

 

       ERICKSON, ERICK, was born in Sweden, but emigrated to the United States, and located in Mapleton, July 6, 1871.  He secured considerable land in sections 19, 20 and 30, and resided on his farm until his decease.  On the 12th day of January, 1888, he went to the haystack in his field to get a load of hay, but was overtaken by the terrible blizzard that occurred on that day, and was frozen to death.  His body was not found for several days.  He was a good citizen and well liked by his neighbors.  At the time of his decease he was about 70 years of age.

 

       GILSETH, OLE OLSON, one of the pioneer farmers of this county, was born in Norway, November 18, 1844.  He emigrated to the United States and lived in Goodhue county, Minnesota, until the fall of 1866, when he and John J. Aasen, Jr., concluded to join their friends John Thompson and John Nelson, who had settled in the Sioux Valley in Dakota, during the spring of that year.  An account of their perilous trip appears in the chapter devoted to reminiscences.  Mr. Gilseth took up land in section 5, in Mapleton, and in section 31, in Sverdrup, to which he has since added by purchased, and now has a good farm of nearly 300 acres, with substantial buildings and improvements.  He has been postmaster of the Republican post office for several years, and has also held the office of school district treasurer.  He is an industrious farmer and a respected citizen.

 

       GUNDERSON, OLE, is a native of Norway, and was born July 22, 1852.  He emigrated to Minnesota in 1866, and in July the following year came to Mapleton, and took up a homestead of 160 acres in section 7 and 8, and engaged in farming.  He has added to his original farm nearly 300 acres in section 8, and also owns 200 acres elsewhere in the county.  In 1882 he was appointed postmaster of the Republican post office, which position he held until 1894.  He has been justice of the peace, assessor, and supervisor and clerk of the town board, and held some of these offices for several successive years.  He has also been a director in the Farmer’s Mutual Fire Insurance Company located in this county.  Few farmers have been more industrious than Ole Gunderson, and his intercourse with his neighbors has been of such a character that no one of them would envy his prosperity, and all would regret any adversity that might over take him.  It is not too much to say that he is one of the most sturdy, reliable citizens in the county.

 

       HAYWARD, REUBEN W., was born at Washington, Washington county, Vermont, in 1844; was raised on a farm, and attended district schools.  On the 8th day of October, 1861, he enlisted in Co. E, First Vermont Cavalry, and served until November 10, 1865; was wounded in the battle of Winchester, and also in the battle of Gettysburg; was taken prisoner twice but got away both times, after being in captivity two days on the first occasion, and one week the second time.  After the war he bought a farm in Vermont and engaged in farming five years; then sold out and went to Colorado, and worked at the mason’s trade four years in Denver, and at freighting and mining four years; then left Colorado, and went to San Francisco, where he remained six months, and then took a trip to Boston for a few months; in 1882 he returned to the West, reaching Sioux Falls on the 7th day of April that year, where he decided to locate.  He engaged in farming on section 16 in Mapleton, and when the school land was opened up for sale he bought a quarter section from the county and resides there at the present time.  He is a thrifty, enterprising farmer, has a good farm, and is a good citizen.

 

       HUNTEMER, JOHN, was born in Potosi, Grant county, Wisconsin, March 15, 1850.  At the age of fourteen years and seven months he enlisted in the First Wisconsin Cavalry, and was one of those who helped capture Jeff Davis, and was paid $300 of the reward offered for his capture.  He came to Sioux Falls with his brother William on the 16th day of April, 1871, and took up the southwest quarter of section 15 in Mapleton, where he resided for about five years when he sold out.  He then went to Dell Rapids and built a hotel of which he was the landlord for about three years, when he sold out and removed to Madison, Lake county, this state, where he still resides.  He enjoys the honor of being the youngest person who enlisted and served during the war of the rebellion from the State of Wisconsin.

 

       INGALLS, JAMES L., was born at Allegany, New York, May 9, 1838.  He received a common school education, and engaged in farming in his native state, Illinois, and Iowa until 1878, when he removed to this county and located in Mapleton in May of that year.  He took up a homestead in section 23, where he has since resided.  In addition to his homestead of 160 acres he has purchased adjoining land and his home farm now comprises about 700 acres.  He has other farms and farm lands in the county, so that in the aggregate he owns upward of 1,500 acres.  For the last few years he has been engaged on quite an extensive scale in the manufacture of cheese, and has made a success of the business.  He is a very industrious, hard-working man, and has been honored by his fellow townsmen by his election to important town offices.  During the time of the resurvey of the township, he was chairman of the board of supervisors, and made a good official.  He is a good neighbor and a good citizen.

 

       KROGSTAD, IVER J., was born in Norway January 12, 1831.  He emigrated to Goodhue county, Minnesota, resided there for two years and came to Dakota and settle din this county June 28, 1868, at which time his neighbors were few and far between.  He made a homestead entry upon the southwest quarter of section 5, in Mapleton, where he still resides.  He has a good farm and is a respected citizen.

 

       MOEN, ESTEN E., was born in Norway November 29, 1857.  He emigrated to this country with his father Esten E. Eggen, and lived with him in Minnesota and Dakota until he took up as a homestead the east half of the northwest quarter of section 19, in Mapleton.  He is also the owner of the southeast quarter of the northeast quarter of section 20, in the same town.  He has held the office of road supervisor and has been school district treasurer ten years.  He is a respected citizen.

 

       MYRICK, LUCIUS O., is a native of Canada, and was born March 15, 1833.  The following year he came to the United States with his parents, who located in Illinois.  In 1873 he became a resident of Minnehaha county, securing as a homestead 120 acres of section 26, and 40 acres of section 25, in Mapleton, where he still resides and has a good farm.  He enlisted in the First Wisconsin artillery, in the fall of 1862, and was honorably discharged in July, 1864.  He has held the office of clerk of the town board of Mapleton, and is a good and respected citizen.

 

       NELSON, IVER, is a native of Norway, and was born August 6, 1835.  He emigrated to this country and lived in Wisconsin and Minnesota prior to his coming to Minnehaha county in June, 1872.  He took up as a homestead the southeast quarter of section 7, in Mapleton, where he resides at the present time, and has a first-class farm, with substantial buildings and improvements.  At the death of his father, Nels Iverson, which occurred a few years ago, he inherited 320 acres of land in sections 17 and 18 in the same town; he has also purchased considerable land, and owns about 600 acres in all.  He is a prosperous farmer  and a respected citizen. Has been town supervisor and school director, and was postmaster of the Republican post office a number of years.

 

      NELSON, JOHN, the pioneer farmer of Mapleton, was born in Norway in 1839, and came to the United States in 1854.  He resided in Wisconsin and Minnesota until 1866, when he and his wife in company with John Thompson and wife started out for Dakota, and arrived in Minnehaha county June 29, of that year.  He took up as a homestead the southeast quarter of section 5 in Mapleton, and pre-empted land in section 17 and 20 in the same township.  He has many interesting incidents to relate of his pioneer days, and one appears in the chapter of reminiscences.  He was postmaster of the Republican post office eleven years, and resided on his farm in Mapleton until a few years ago, when he removed to Arlington, Kingsbury county, this state.  Mr. Nelson is kind and obliging, and is an enterprising and respected citizen.

 

       O’GRADY, JOHN, was born in Ireland April 16, 1848, and emigrated to the United Sates in 1864.  About the 10th day of June, 1866, he came to Sioux Falls with Company D, 22d U.S. Infantry.  Mr. O’Grady says that “at that time the company was under the command of Colonel Knox, and had been ordered to Sioux Falls to relieve Company E, 6th Iowa Cavalry.  There were then about twenty-five or thirty cavalry men in Sioux Falls, and they left eh same day the infantry arrived.  Dr. Nisley and Mr. Pratt, the hospital steward, who had been with the cavalry company, remained.  A commissary building was constructed by our company just below where the west end of the Eighth street bridge is now located, and a building for officers quarters was erected where E. J. Daniels’ store now is.  An addition to the sutler’s store in the block southeast of the Cataract hotel was also built, and a guardhouse north and west of the barracks near Seventh street.  There was a large log house north of the barracks, with only a wagon road between the two buildings.  It was about thirty feet square and built of heavy logs, with a dirt roof; there was no floor, except overhead, which was made of cottonwood boards, intended as a last resort from which to shoot in case of attack.  This building, which had been erected before our company arrived, was used by us as an armory.  In 1868 Colonel Knox went to Philadelphia, and Captain John Duffy succeeded him in command.  In April, 1869, I was discharged, my term of enlistment having expired.  During the summer of 1869 the company left for Fort Randall.”  Soon after, when the military reservation was opened for settlers, Mr. O’Grady secured 120 acres, located on each of the banks of the Sioux river, which divides his farm into nearly two equal parts.  He has been an industrious man, and is a good citizen.

 

       OLSON, JONAS, one of the pioneers of Mapleton township, was born in Norway February 8, 1845; came to the United States in 1867, and located in this county in 1868, where he has since resided.  He secured a pre-emption and a homestead when he first came here, the former of which he sold, the latter he still retains, comprising the southeast quarter of section 9, in the town of Mapleton.  He has a splendid farm with good buildings and improvements, one barn alone costing about $2,000.  He has added to his land by purchase so that now he owns about 400 acres, and is well-to-do.  He has always taken an active interest in the welfare of his town, has held the office of town treasurer several years, and since 1893, has been one of the supervisors of the town board.  He is highly esteemed as a neighbor and citizen.

 

      PETERSON, ROBERT, was born at Merager, in the province of Trondhjem, Norway, on the 11th day of December, 1822.  Emigrated to the United States with his family in 1858, and settled in Goodhue county, Minnesota, and engaged in farming for ten years.  In September, 1868, came to Dakota, and located about nine miles up the river from Sioux Falls, which at that time was a military post.  The first winter they lived with John Nelson, a nephew of Mrs. Peterson, who had a cabin about two miles farther north.  The following year Mr. Peterson commenced building a log house which is shown in accompanying illustration, on the northwest quarter of section 17, in Mapleton, which was then within the boundaries of the military reservation.  He had not more than done so, when one day he was called upon by a squad of soldiers, who fired their guns in order to frighten the sturdy pioneer, and threatened him with arrest if he did not immediately vacate.  But John Nelson happened to be there, and remonstrated saying they were not to be so easily frightened away, and Mr. Peterson decided to remain.  The soldiers then arrested Mr. Peterson, brought him to Sioux Falls, and kept him in the guardhouse over night.  The next day Mr. Nelson went to see the colonel, and showed the following letter form Congressman Spink, written at Yankton June 19, 1869:  “John Nelson, Esq. Dear Friend:  The Adjutant General of the United States, in reply to inquiries, informs me that the Commissioner of the General Land Office had been notified by the War Department, on the 9th day of June, that the military reservation at Sioux Falls had been abandoned.  This, of course, opens up the land to settlement.  Please inform the people of your vicinity. Your friend, S.L. Spink.”  This had the effect of immediately releasing Mr. Peterson.  The colonel, however, made a long report of the occurrence, which was forwarded to the proper authorities.  Mr. Peterson secured the east half of the northeast quarter of section 18, and the west half of the northwest quarter of section 17, as a pre-emption, and later took up a homestead comprising the east half of the northwest quarter, and the west half of the northeast quarter of section 17, in Mapleton, and afterwards bought 160 acres in section 18.  He resided on his farm until his death, which occurred on the 29th day of August, 1887, survived by his wife, two sons and a daughter.  Mr. Peterson was one of those sturdy settlers, who in honesty of purpose, and perseverance and endurance in hardship will never be surpassed.

 

       PETERSON, PETER R., a son of Robert Peterson, was born in Goodhue county, Minnesota, July 8, 1861.  He came with his parents to this county in the fall of 1868, and when the settlement was large enough to have a school he received his education there.  He worked on his father’s farm and grew up with the country.  At the time of his father’s death he took charge of the home farm in section 17, where he still resides with his mother.  He is well-to-do, is a good farmer, energetic and enterprising, and is a respected citizen.

 

      PETERSON, IVER R., a brother of Peter R. Peterson, was born in Goodhue county, Minnesota, March 21, 1867, but came with his parents to this county the following year, where he received his education, and worked on his father’s farm.  At the death of his father, in 1887, he inherited 106 acres of land in section 18 in Mapleton, where he is now engaged in farming, and has a good farm.  He is a good citizen.

 

       RENNER, LEONARD, is a prosperous farmer residing in Mapleton township, where he bought and now owns about 960 acres of land in sections 8,9,15,16,17 and 22.  He has a comfortable and attractive residence, and good outbuildings and barns for stock and machinery.  He was born in Germany June 9, 1840, emigrated to the United States in 1848, lived in New York two years and in Wisconsin from 1850 to 1878, when he removed to Dakota and has been a well-known resident of this county ever since.  He has been assessor and a member of the town board of Mapleton for several years.  During the war of the rebellion he served in Battery B, 1st Illinois Light Artillery, and was a noncommissioned officer two years.  The C.,M. & St. Paul Railroad Company has recently established a station, called Renner, on his farm.  Mr. Renner is an enterprising and highly esteemed citizen.

 

     SEAGER, RICHARD M., was born in Virgil, Cortland county, New York, July 31, 1860.  His early years were spent on a farm and in attending the public schools.  He completed his education at Dryden, New York, and was graduated from the Dryden academy.  He commenced teaching school when sixteen years of age and was thus employed for two years.  His next business was farming in Iowa; then he spent a short time in Minnesota and from there went to work upon the famous Dwight farm in North Dakota; then drifted into Montana and was at Miles City when the Northern Pacific railroad first reached that place.  He then went back to New York and was employed for three years in woolen mills, and in 1887 came from there to this county, where he has since been engaged in farming in Mapleton.  He is clerk of school district No. 17, and has been town clerk of Mapleton since 1891.  He is a good neighbor and highly respected citizen.

 

      TABOR, HOLMES, was born in Greenwich, Washington county, New York, March 7, 1837.  At the age of eleven years he removed to Livingston county, New York, where he received a good education.  From there removed to Detroit, Michigan, where he taught school ten years, and was school inspector the same length of time.  Was in the postal service for ten years, and held the office of justice of the peace four years where he resided, and also the office of supervisor.  He resided for about three years in Kansas and Nevada.  In 1885 came to this county, and settled in Mapleton, where he engaged in farming in sections 30 and 31.  While a resident of Mapleton he was one of the supervisors of the town board for two years.  A few years ago he removed to the city of Sioux Falls and more recently to Kansas City where he now resides.  He is a well informed man, and always took an active part in public matters, and he would feel that his record was not complete if it failed to state that he was always a zealous Republican.

 

 

   
 

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