PALISADE TOWNSHIP

 

(103-47)

 

 

 

     This township is bounded on the east by the Minnesota state line, which was surveyed in 1862.  The north, south and west lines were surveyed by M.K. Armstrong in October, 1864, and the subdivisions were made the same month by Carl C.P. Meyer.  The township contains 15,069.45 acres of land.  There were settlers in this township in 1873, and during the next three or four years quite a number of persons took up land there and engaged in farming.  The name Palisade was suggested by the peculiar formation of the channel through which the Split Rock river flows in sections 30 and 31.  The soil is good, and the surface gently rolling, except along the banks of the Split Rock.

 

     The first school was taught in the fall of 1877 in a sod shanty belonging to Hans Nitteberg, which was located on the northwest quarter of section 8.  The teacher was Miss Mattie Rasch, who came from Iowa, and at the close of the school returned home.  A post office was established on the southwest quarter of section 4 in 1874, and Job Wood, who also kept a hotel, was appointed postmaster.  The office was named Pleasant Valley, and remained there about eight years, when it was moved to the northwest quarter of the same section, and the name changed to Rapid Creek.  Truman Griggs was postmaster of this office for two years, when it was moved about forty rods across the state line into Minnesota, the name changed back to Pleasant Valley, and Charles Reynolds appointed postmaster.

 

     A second post office was established in this township in August, 1878, and was located near the southeast corner of the southwest quarter of section 30, where a little village soon sprang up.  C.W. Patten had previously built a small custom flour mill on the Split Rock at this point.  He purchased some of the timber that was in the old barracks at Sioux Falls, which he used in the construction of the mill dam, but a few years after, during high water, the dam went out, and, as one of the old settlers of Palisade said to the writer, “quite a number of farmers living on the banks of the Split Rock below the old mill site secured some of this timber, which may still be seen in their farm buildings.”  This little village was in a prosperous condition when the Willmar & Sioux Falls railroad was built and a station established at this point in the fall of 1888, but when the Sioux City & Northern railroad was built into the township, forming a junction with the Willmar & Sioux Falls on section 20, the village of Palisade was doomed.  The residents accepted the situation, and the buildings were moved to Garretson.

 

 

 

SHERMAN

 

       In 1888, when the Willmar & Sioux Falls railroad opened for traffic, a station named for E.A. Sherman, one of the directors of the road, was established on the northwest quarter of section 4, and eleven blocks were platted by E.A. Sherman, and M.J. Zeliff and wife during that year, with a view to starting a village.  A post office was also established the same year, and A.C. Berg, who had formed a copartnerhsip with C.A. Estenson and opened a general store, was appointed postmaster, and held that office until January 1, 1899, when O.B. Bratager assumed the duties of the office.  There are now two general stores, one hardware and one drug store, and a blacksmith shop, doing business at Sherman.  It is an important point for the shipment of grain, although only four miles from the city of Garretson.  Peavy & Co. have an elevator with a capacity of 45,000 bushels, and there are two other large elevators, one with a capacity of 35,000 bushels, and the other 20,000 bushels.  The little village of Sherman is pleasantly located, and the inhabitants are already anticipating the time when they will have a municipal government.

 

 

 

PALISADE TOWNSHIP BOARD

 

1881.  Supervisors, A.E. Bothwell, J.W. Wood, A.J. Cooley; clerk, Ole Rudd; treasurer, C.W. Patten; assessor, Frank Eastman; justices, A. Herbert, Ole A. Hanson; constables, Kirk Herbert, O. G. Auly.  Mr. Bothwell was chairman of the board during the year 1881.

 

1882.  Supervisors, A.E. Bothwell chairman, A.J. Colley, E. Olson; treasurer, C.W. Patten; assessor, Ole A. Hanson; constables, Ed. Beardsley, John Rudd.  July 20, Ellef Ellefson was appointed supervisor to fill vacancy.  At the end of the fiscal year the treasurer reported money received $156.20, balance on hand 28.10.

 

  1883.  Supervisors, A.E. Bothwell chairman, Ellef E. Ellefson, E. Royce; treasurer, C.W. Patten; assessor, Ole A. Hanson; justices, A. Herbert, Hans S. Nitteberg; constables, John Rudd, Ira Royce.

 

  1884.  Supervisors, A.E. Bothwell chairman, E. Royce, Andrew Morrison; clerk, Ole Rudd; treasurer, C.W. Patten; assessor, Ole A. Hanson; justices, C.W. Patten, J.W. Wood; constables, Ira Royce, John Rudd.  June 2, the board met with the board of Highland and divided the work on the highway between the two townships.

 

1885.  Supervisors, F.L. Herbert chairman, John Rudd, Lewis Gilbert; clerk, Ole Rudd; treasurer, C.W. Patten.

 

1886.  Supervisors, F.L. Herbert chairman, Lewis Gilbert, Wm. Nevill; clerk, O.A. Hanson; treasurer, C.W. Patten; assessor, Anton Rudd; justices, W.B. Allen, L.M. Jacobson; constables, A.J. Cooley, John Steinmetz.

 

  1887.  Supervisors, James Whealey chairman, John Overbee, A.J. Cooley; clerk, Peter F. Eichner; treasurer, C.W. Patten; assessor, Anton H. Rudd.  A by-law was adopted “prohibiting nonresidents from hunting in this township without the permission of the owners.”

 

1888.  Supervisors, James Whealey chairman, A.J. Cooley, John K. Overbee; clerk, P.F. Eichner; treasurer, C.W. Patten; assessor, Anton Rudd; justices, F.L. Herbert, E. Humphrey; constables, John Steinmetz, O.A. Hanson.  There were thirty-nine votes cast at this election.

 

  1889.  Supervisors, James Whealey chairman, John Rudd; Magnus Johnson; clerk, P.F. Eichner; treasurer, M.H. Wangness; assessor, A.H. Rudd; justice, E.E. Cross.

 

1890.  Supervisors, John Rudd chairman, Magnus Johnson, A.J. Cooley; clerk, P.F. Eichner; treasurer, M.H. Wangsness; assessor, Ole Rudd; justices, O.A. Hanson, E.E. Cross; constables, John Steinmetz, E.N.W. Shook.  Fifty-five votes were cast at this election.  May 30, diphtheria having appeared in a boarding house in Garretson the house was quarantined and orders issued to several persons to keep their premises clean and properly drained; a small building was erected to be used as a hospital.  July 8, Charles Eastman was appointed justice to fill vacancy caused by the resignation of E.E. Cross.  October 4, George E. Beardsley was appointed clerk in place of P.F. Eichner, resigned.  November 4, Edward Eastman was appointed justice in place of Charles Eastman, resigned.  At the close of the year the treasurer reported that he had received $413.94, that orders in the sum of $136.32 had been issued on account of diphtheria and the erection of a hospital, which should be paid by the county, and that he indebtedness of the township aside from this was $191.80.

 

  1891.  Supervisors, James Whealey chairman, Ole A. Hanson, A.J. Cooley; clerk, L.M. Jacobson; treasurer, M.H. Wangsness; assessor, Ole Rudd; justice, E. Eastwood; constable, A. Estenson.  The number of votes cast was 109.  June 27, Melvin Zeliff was appointed justice in place of O.A. Hanson, resigned, and it was decided to build several stone culverts during the year.

 

  1892.  Supervisors, James Whealey chairman, Ole A. Hanson, John H. Bly; clerk, L.M. Jacobson; treasurer, John Overbee; assessor, Ole Rudd; justices, Emory Royce, Job W. Wood; constables, Magnus Johnson, C.A. Estenson.  There were twenty-six votes cast at this election, and it was voted “that the pesthouse be moved to some suitable place by the board to be used for town purposes, and in which to hold their meetings.” March 29, the board directed O.A. Hanson to hire men and teams to move the pesthouse onto the northwest corner of section 22, and that the building should be called Palisade Townhall.  John Lewis and Ole Rudd were appointed justices in the place of Royce and Wood, who had failed to qualify.  June 27, the board directed the posting of five notices to the effect that all noxious weeds must be destroyed during the months of July and August, and that the same notice be published in the Garretson Progress.  November 12, the board ordered that the pesthouse be moved on to the corner of section 16, there to be used as a townhall.

 

  1893.  Supervisors, Ole A. Hanson chairman, John H. Bly, John Lewis; clerk, L.M. Jacobson; treasurer, John Overbee; assessor, Ole Rudd; justices, Alexander Allen, George W. Peterson.  Twenty-eight votes were cast.  A Vote was taken upon the question whether or not the township should be resurveyed, resulting in 11 votes for and 7 against.  November 11, the board met at H.H. Keith’s office to draw a contract with John O. Langness for a resurvey of the township, but Mr. Langness not being willing to agree upon the terms proposed, the contract was let to T.M. Patten, who agreed to do the work and pay all the expenses, except furnishing monuments, for the sum of $350.

 

1894.  Supervisors, O.A. Hanson chairman, Fred Steinmetz, Magnus Johnson; clerk, L.M. Jacobson; treasurer, John Overbee; assessor, Ole Rudd; justices, George W. Peterson, Emory Royce; constables, Ed Lewis, A.C. Estenson.  Forty-six ballots were cast.  A motion was made and carried that no taxes be levied during the years.  March 22, George W. Peterson was appointed supervisor, Fred Steinmetz refusing to qualify; Lewis Gilbert and J.J. LaDue were appointed justices in the place of Peterson and Royce who failed to qualify.  During this year there were quite a number of meetings of the board to consider road work, the building of culverts and bridges, the vaccination of the people; to give instructions to the road overseers in consequence of the resurvey, and to prosecute persons obstructing the highways.

 

  1895.  Supervisors, G.W. Peterson chairman, F.L. Herbert, Andreas Larhahl; clerk, L.M. Jacobson; treasurer, John K. Overbee; assessor, Ole Rudd.

 

  1896.  Supervisors, A.J. Cooley chairman, Magnus Johnson, A.O. Lardahl; clerk, G.W. Peterson; treasurer, John Overbee; assessor, Ole Rudd.

 

  1897.  Supervisors, A.J. Cooley chairman, Magnus Johnson, John Ingebretson; clerk, G.W. Peterson; treasurer, John Overbee; assessor, Ole Rudd.

 

  1898.  Supervisors, A.J. Cooley chairman, J.H. Bly, John Ingebretson; clerk, G.W. Peterson; treasurer, John K. Overbee; assessor, Ole Rudd.

 

  1899.  Supervisors, O.A. Hanson, Magnus Johnson, J.J. Klungness; clerk, G.W. Peterson; treasurer, Wm. Pierce; assessor, Ole Rudd.

 

 

 

 

 

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES

 

 

 

     BERG, A.C., is a native of Norway, and was born September 11, 1860; emigrated with his parents to the United States in 1872, and lived in Michigan two years, where he attended the public schools; removed to Dakota and settled in this county on the 9th day of September, 1874, his father, C.A. Berg, taking up land in section 19 in Highland township.  He remained with his father working on the farm and attending the Augustana College at Canton until 1886, when he went to Dell Rapids and clerked for R.W. Howland for some time, then returned home, got married, and lived on the farm until 1888.  At that time he removed to Sherman, where he, in partnership with his brother-in-law, C.A. Estensen, opened a general store under the firm name of Berg, Estensen & Co., and since then has been doing a successful business at that place.  He has been a member of the school board six years, and postmaster at Sherman from 1888 to 1899.  He is a good business man, an enterprising, respected citizen, and well liked.

 

 

 

     BLY, JOHN H., was born in Lee county, Illinois, March 16, 1862.  He came to this county in 1886, and bought the southeast quarter of section 32 in Palisade, where he has since resided, and has a good farm.  He has been a member of the town board of supervisors for two years, and clerk of the school board four years.  He is a good farmer and a good citizen.

 

 

 

     COOLEY, ALFRED J., is a native of Wisconsin, and was born August 15, 1851.  He lived there and in Canada, Minnesota and California before he settled in this county in 1874, where he has since resided.  He took up 160 acres as a homestead in sections 25 in Edison, and 30 and 31 in Palisade, and a tree claim the northeast quarter of section 32 in the last named township.  He resides on his homestead, and has a good farm with substantial buildings and improvements.  He has been a member of the town board of supervisors several years, and for the last three years has been its chairman.  He is a good neighbor and a highly esteemed citizen.

 

 

 

     ESTENSON, C. ALFRED, was born in Norway in 1866, but while an infant came to this country with his father, Eistin Eistinson, who settled in Calumet, Michigan, and remained there until 1871, when he removed with his family to his county and settled in Dell Rapids township.  The subject of this sketch was reared on a farm and educated in the public schools, attended an academy at Red Wing, Minn., one year, and the Augustana College at Canton, one term.  In 1888, formed a copartnership with A.C. Berg and opened a general store at Sherman, where the firm has since been doing a successful business.  Mr. Estensen is a good business man and an enterprising citizen.

 

 

 

     HANSON, O.A., is a native of Norway, and was born December 7, 1850.  He came to the United States in 1869, and lived in Wisconsin six years.  In the spring of 1875 he came to this county and settled on his present homestead, the northwest quarter of section 3, in Palisade, and the following year he filed a tree claim on the northwest quarter of section 10, in the same town.  He is also the owner of 320 acres of farm land in Rock county, Minnesota, but resides on his homestead in Palisade, which is a good farm with substantial buildings.  His farm is only a quarter of a mile from Sherman and is watered by the Split Rock which runs through his land both in this county and in Minnesota.  Mr. Hanson takes an active part in town affairs, has been a member of the school board about fifteen years, assessor four years, justice of the peace, and clerk and supervisor of the town board several years, also its chairman.  He is not only a good farmer but is a good neighbor and a highly respected citizen.

 

 

 

     HERBERT, FRANK L., was born in Canton, Fulton county, Illinois, March 6, 1849.  He lived there and in Iowa and Minnesota before he settled in this county in April, 1875.  He took up as a homestead the north half of the northwest quarter of section 28, and the south half of the southwest quarter of section 21, and as a tree claim the southeast quarter of section 29, in Palisade.  He resides on his homestead in section 21, has a good farm and is a good citizen.

 

 

 

     JACOBSON, LARS M., is the owner of and resides upon the east half of the northeast quarter of section 21, in Palisade.  He was born in Norway, January 25, 1851, and came to the United States and to Dakota in 1870.  He remained in Dakota one year, and then went to Iowa where he remained until April, 1882, at which time he removed to Palisade and bought the farm he now resides upon.  He has been justice of the peace three years, school district clerk nine years and town clerk five years.  He is a good citizen and highly esteemed by his neighbors.

 

 

 

     JOHNSON, BERNARD, was born in the city of Kongsberg, Norway, November 21, 1853.  He emigrated to the United States and settled in Wisconsin, removed from there to Minnesota and came to this county in 1876.  He took up a homestead in section 7, in Palisade, where he still resides and has a good farm.  He has held the office of school treasurer, and is a good citizen.

 

 

 

     JOHNSON, MAGNUS, was born in Sweden, October 26, 1847.  He became a sailor when quite young, and followed this occupation nine years, visiting the United States for the first time in 1865.  In 1876 he settled in Santa Clara county, California, where he remained for seven years engaged in farming.  Early in 1882 he visited his old home in Sweden for a few months, and upon his return to this country located at Valley Springs, where he resided three years.  He bought the southwest quarter of section 33, in Palisade, and in 1886 moved onto this land, and still resides there.  He has a good farm, and is a good, reliable citizen.  He has been one of the supervisors of Palisade several years, constable two years, and treasurer of the school district in which he resides four years.  His family consists of wife and four children.

 

 

 

     KLUNGNESS, J.J., is a native of Norway, and was born July 5, 1846.  He emigrated to the United States in 1872, lived in Iowa two years, and came to Dakota in 1874.  He took up as a homestead 160 acres of section 27, where he still resides and has one of the finest farms in Palisade.  The following year, 1875, he took up as a tree claim the southwest quarter of the same section, and now owns 320 acres of land under good cultivation.  He has held the office of director of the school board, and is a good farmer and a good citizen.

 

 

 

     LOCKE, WILLIAM A., was born in Wisconsin, in 1850.  He lived there and in Illinois and Iowa prior to his coming to Dakota in 1880.  He has a fine farm of 200 acres in section 5, in Palisade, where he has resided ever since he first came here, and thinks that Dakota is better than any other place he has lived in.  He is a good citizen.

 

 

 

     NITTEBERG, HANS STENER, was born in Norway, May 23, 1828.  He emigrated to this country in 1869, lived in Minnesota and Wisconsin for some time and came to Dakota in 1873.  He took up as a homestead the south half of the southwest quarter of section 5, and the north half of the northwest quarter of section 8 in Palisade.  He still lives on his homestead and has a good farm.  Mr. Nitteberg was a soldier in Norway for several years.

 

 

 

     OVERBEE, JOHN K., was born in Norway in 1850.  He emigrated to the United States and lived in Iowa from 1871 till June, 1876, at which time he located in this county on his present farm in section 9 in Palisade.  He has been treasurer of school district No. 30 since 1880, town supervisor two years, and town treasurer since 1892.  He has a good farm, and is an active, enterprising citizen.

 

 

 

      PETERSON, GEORGE W., well and favorably known by every old settler of this county, is a native of Canada and was born June 30, 1853.  He came to the United States and located with his parents in Minnesota in 1865.  In 1878 he came to Dakota and took up land in McCook county, but removed to Sioux Falls the same year, where he opened a meat market.  He carried on this business until 1891, at which time he bought the northwest quarter of section 22, in Palisade, where he and his estimable wife now reside and have a very pleasant home.  Mr. Peterson takes great interest in the welfare of his town, and has held several prominent township offices from time to time.  He is an enterprising and upright citizen and a good neighbor.

 

 

 

     PIERCE, WILLIAM, was born in Illinois, October 7, 1855.  He went to Iowa and lived there and in Minnesota until 1885, when he removed to this county.  He located on the northeast quarter of section 22 in Palisade, where he engaged in farming, and has a good farm.  He is a well-known and respected citizen.

 

 

 

     ROYCE, EMERY, was born in Illinois in 1849.  He resided there and in Iowa until he came to Dakota in May, 1871.  He took up as a homestead the southeast quarter of section 27 in Mapleton, now owned by Minnehaha county and known as the county poor-farm.  There were no settlers north of him in the eastern half of the township of Mapleton in 1871, but the next year he had neighbors on all sides.  At the first great ball in Sioux Falls, which took place on New Year’s eve in 1872, at the Cataract House, Mr. Royce and his brother furnished the music, and he says “it was a great society event.”  In 1878 he sold his farm and removed to Palisade where he engaged in the mercantile business and was the postmaster until 1886, when he again went to farming in Palisade township.  He is an enterprising, good citizen.

 

 

 

     ROYCE, EZRA, was born in Illinois 1848.  He was reared on a farm and educated in the district schools.  In 1872 he came to this county from Iowa, and settled in Palisade, taking up the northwest quarter of section 29 as a homestead and the southeast quarter of section 31 as a tree claim.  In 1897 he removed to the state of Washington.

 

 

 

     RUDD, JOHN H., is a native of Norway and was born November 28, 1850.  In 1872 he emigrated to the United States, and came to Minnehaha county on the 17th day of May, 1873, and resided on his homestead in section 8, in Palisade, until 1897, when he rented his farm and removed to Hills, Minnesota.  He has been chairman of the town board of supervisors and has held several other town offices in Palisade.  If he had been postmaster upon the incoming of Cleveland’s first administration he would have been promptly removed for “pernicious activity in politics.”  He lives up to the full measure of his rights as a citizen, starts early for the primaries, is always around when there is a convention to be held by his party, and never leaves the polls until the last vote is counted.  A man of this character is always an enterprising citizen, and John H. Rudd is no exception to the general rule.

 

 

 

     RUDD, OLE, was born in Norway, November 30, 1847, and emigrated to the United States in 1871.  He has always been engaged in farming, and resided in Iowa, Minnesota and Wisconsin before he came to Minnehaha county in July, 1877.  Upon coming to this county he obtained title to the northwest quarter of section 15 in Palisade through a pre-emption filing, and has since then made it his home.  He has a good farm with pleasant surroundings.  Like his brother John, he has been honored with town offices.  Upon the organization of the township he was elected clerk of the town board and was re-elected several time to this office as well as that of assessor, etc.  He is a good citizen and official, and is highly respected.

 

 

 

     TANNER, ZACHARIAS, was born in the town of Schuyler, Herkimer county, New York, October 12, 1825.  He lived in New York, Illinois and Iowa before he came to this county, where he arrived in June, 1874.  He filed a homestead upon the southwest quarter of section 3, in Palisades, where he has been a well-known resident ever since.

 

 

 

     WHEALEY, JAMES, was born in Huntington county, Canada, April 17, 1848.  He came to the United States in 1863, and lived in New York until he removed to this county in 1875.  He took up as a homestead the northeast quarter of section 28 in Palisade, bought the northwest quarter of section 27, and now has a fine farm of 320 acres.  He has been chairman of the town board of supervisors, and school director several years, and is an industrious farmer and a respected citizen.

 

 

 

     WOOD, JOB W., was born in the town of Coventry, Chenango county, New York, December 27, 1842.  He came to this county on the 12th day of June, 1873, after having resided in the states of New York, Virginia, North Carolina, Wisconsin, Iowa, Nebraska and Texas.  He secured by pre-emption the northwest quarter of section 4 in Palisade, where he lived for twenty years, removing from the state in 1893.  He was postmaster in 1874, and has been justice of the peace, and was well known to nearly every early settler in the county as a good citizen.

 

 

 

     ZELIFF, M.J., was born in Cayuga county, New York, on the 31st day of July, 1833.  He was reared on a farm and educated in the public schools.  After having lived in Michigan, Illinois, Indiana and Iowa he came to this county May 25, 1874, and took up as a homestead the northeast quarter of section 4 in Palisade, and also secured the southeast quarter of section 33 in Highland.  He set out 30 acres of trees on his farm, and cared for them so well that he now has one of the finest groves in the county.  He has made maple sugar several years, and has walnut trees from which he has gathered nuts.  He has also quite a thrifty little apple orchard, crab and standard trees, which have borne fruit in abundance for several years.  The town site of Sherman, where there is also a station on the Great Northern railroad, is located on his homestead.  Mr. Zeliff is an energetic, enterprising citizen.

 

 

 

 

 

DEVIL’S GULCH

 

 

 

     Devil’s Gulch, located on the east side of the Split Rock river in section 17, in Palisade township, is a remarkable gulch.  Its southern extremity is less than half a mile north of the city of Garretson, where it forms a junction with the Split Rock river.  The head of this gulch is in a natural basin, about two hundred rods northeast from the junction, where bare rocks, worn by water may be seen near the surface of the ground.  Following its course southwesterly, a channel is formed through the rocks, gradually growing deeper for a considerable distance, only the east side of the channel is abrupt, the west side being a gradual slope for some distance back, but as the gulch proper is approached the channel is through solid rock, both sides being almost perpendicular for a short distance, when a basin containing water is reached which is a little more than one hundred feet in diameter.  Near the point where this channel enters the basin there is another channel through the rocks form the northwest portion of the basin.  This is narrow, and quite steep, but the basin can be reached through this channel.  At the south end of the basin the channel through the rocks is not more than eight to ten feet in width, but it is only for a few feet when another basin is reached similar to the preceding one.  After leaving this basin the west side only is abrupt, the east side being covered with trees for a distance of about twenty rods.  At this point the people of Garretson have commenced fitting up the grounds suitable for picnic parties, and the possibilities for making it one of the most pleasant and enjoyable places in the county for picnic excursions are so apparent that the writer confidently predicts that in the near future visitors to Devil’s Gulch will find beautiful grounds, walks, bridges and seats, which will add materially to their comfort while viewing this weird, picturesque and wonderfully unique natural formation.

 

     In July, 1894, there appeared in the Saturday Blade, published at Chicago, a double-column cut of this gulch, and in connection with it a romantic story of tragedy which occurred within the walls of this wonderful formation.  It is impossible at this time to verify its truthfulness, but there are so many people who believe in dreams, and are in such dire need of incidents of this character to sustain them, that we insert below the story as it was given in the Blade.

 

     “In the early days of the Dakotas, James Harding, wife, son and daughter, emigrated from eastern Wisconsin.  While in camp on the bank of the Sioux, about a half a mile from the Split Rock river, they were surprised by a band of Indians, led by a white renegade, and Harding and his wife and son murdered, while Nellie was carried away captive.

 

     In his far-away Wisconsin home, on the night of the massacre, Dick Willowby, the young girl’s lover, dreamed a fearful dream.  He saw clearly depicted the vicinity and scenes of the murder, and the dream made so great an impression upon him that he immediately started, armed and equipped, upon the route previously pursued by his friends.  After two weeks’ hard riding he arrived at the little village of Worthington, and learned that the Harding family left there the night before he had his dream.  Hurrying onward he came late in the afternoon upon the country seen in his vision.  A mile in advance stood the Harding wagon.  Arriving at the camp, what a fearful sight met his anxious eyes!  Father, mother and son murdered, and Nellie gone!  After following the trail about ten miles up the Split Rock river he espied a narrow ravine, or canyon, about eighty rods long, running back from the river.  The sides rose perpendicularly from eighty to one hundred feet, and along the bottom was a small stream.  This was Devil’s Gulch.  Out upon a shelving rock he saw the light of a fire.  Creeping softly up he saw half a dozen Indians and a white man.  Raising his rifle and taking careful aim, he fired and an Indian bit the dust.  Another fell at the second fire.  There was only one means of egress from their fastness and that was barricaded by an avenging rifle.  Again and again the rifle spoke.  Consternation seized the Indians.  Their invisible enemy fired again.  The remaining Indians threw themselves into the depths below.  The white renegade stood alone.  Pausing an instant he darted to one side and in a moment reappeared with Nellie.  There was a report of a pistol, a wild scream and Nellie was dead.  Dashing up a rock the renegade mounted a horse and flew for his life.  But his pursuer was close behind.  For five miles the race was kept up, when the renegade’s horse stumbled, throwing his rider to the ground.  He faced his foe in an instant.  There were two rapid reports and the renegade had paid for his crime with his life.  Dick Willowby, mortally wounded, dragged himself back to the rock where Nellie lay.  There, with her clasped in his arms, he was found.  The body of the renegade was found in Rose Dell township, Minnesota.”

 

 

   
 

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